How to Maintain Moral Values in the Professional World

Have you ever heard the older generations complain about how rude and oblivious millennials and Gen-Z-ers are? Well even though you shouldn’t cast broad generalizations on a whole age group of people, they do have a point. Before you get defensive, please know that I too am a millennial. Even though I’m in my mid-20s, I attended Christian school for seven years of my childhood and worked in the service industry for six years of my young adulthood. Those might seem like random tidbits about me, but long story short it means I’ve been formally trained in the art of saying please, thank you, and I’m sorry. I probably over use these terms compared to the average human being due to the constant repetition over the years. Even though some might say that I’m too polite in certain situations, I have personally seen where it has helped me professionally and with each end customer I’ve ever interacted with. The problem in my opinion is that in modern times we’ve become so focused on new technology and innovation in the workplace, that we’ve lost touch with the human aspect of business. That may sound ridiculous, but many of the kind-hearted gestures associated with client relations are now considered to be “old-fashioned” or cliche. Well, I’m here to tell you that you can be both a modern business with up-to-date technology, while maintaining the familiarity of successful businesses in the past. I believe it all starts with these things: Continue reading

Showing Your Support by Reading In Between the Lines

I’m an only child who grew up being somewhat shy and introverted. Even though in our society those traits can be considered negative, I’m actually incredibly thankful. Growing up as a fairly quiet child, I learned one valuable skill: the art of paying attention! Over time I became a good listener, started paying attention to details, and  observed people and situations closely. It made me realize that there are so many forms of communication that are completely overlooked, since they aren’t actually spoken. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve realized that the unspoken communication is more important in the long run. We tend to be so afraid of the backlash we might receive or the consequences we have to face by speaking out, that we often end up bottling everything in until it comes seeping out in passive aggressive body language and behavior. So, you’re probably asking yourself what my point is here. Well, I’ve learned that by paying attention to these social cues from your peers you can prevent certain emotions from escalating. These in my opinion are the best ways to start reading between the lines and show your support. Continue reading